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Fake Footage from the Ukraine




This new footage from the Ukraine is fake. It's a man in a costume.



There is no history of sightings in the Ukraine. The closest area with a history of sightings is the Caucasus Mountains.

Don't be fooled about the geography by someone making the ludicrous claim that the Caucasus Mountains and the Crimean Mountains are "practically connected." They are not connected.

To go from the Caucasus Mountains to the Crimean Mountains in the Ukraine, a bigfoot would need to make a 1,000 KM trek around the Sea of Azov ... through open grasslands with no cover.

There is no way that a bigfoot would go anywhere near the Kerch Strait (the water gap separating the Russian shoreline of the Black Sea from the Crimea shoreline) much less cross it. To even get near the Kerch Strait a bigfoot would have to cross 70 miles of terrain so barren (on both sides of the Strait) that there aren't even any bushes, just short grasses and plowed fields. No animals larger than a rabbit live there.

Not surprisingly, there have never been any in sightings, track finds, etc., anywhere between the Crimea and the Caucasus. So if a bigfoot were to be in the Crimean Mountains, then several bigfoots must have been living there for a long, long time, yet only two (2) stories and one (1) video have ever surfaced, and all of them popped up in the past few years.

Sorry, Ukrainians, but there are no bigfoots in your country, and this recent video footage is definitely a hoax.


Fake videos on YouTube are nothing new. The only difference these days is that some fake bigfoot videos seem to get mentioned in the mainstream media more often.

This recent clip from the Ukraine may have gotten some traction in the press due to a recent news story about a Russian effort to study Russian bigfoots with academic support. That story was widely publicized, so it likely made the Ukraine footage seem more worthy of mention.

The lack of historical indicators for the Ukraine is not the only reason to belive the footage is fake. The footage itself indicates fabrication. The unnatural movements and tone of the cameraman, combined with the movements of the figure, strongly point toward a crude hoax.

The nearest region to the Ukraine with a substantial history of reports is the Caucasus Mountains, between the Black Sea and Caspian Sea. There may be one or two stories from Ukraine (Crimea), but that is what one would expect, even if there were no actual sightings. In the Caucasus, by contrast, there are hundreds of witness accounts extending back into history, and many living eyewitnesses.

If "Caucasus" sounds familiar to your ears, it is probably because you are familiar with the word "caucasian". Ethnographers (i.e. people who study ethnic groups) long believed that all white people (i.e. the various ethnicities that black people would call "white") can trace their roots back to this mountain range. Whether or not that's true, it is definitely the meaning behind the label "caucasian".

Bigfoots are called "Almasty" (or "Almasti") in Caucasus mountain range.

Q: Why have you never seen any TV documentaries about the Almasty creatures of the Caucasus Mountains?

A: It is a very unsafe region for outsiders to explore.

There are civil wars and/or Muslim insurgencies in nearly every part of the Caucasus (e.g. Chechnya, Dagestan, North and South Ossetia, Azerbaijan, North Georgia, southern Russia, etc.). It will be decades before the region is safe enough for a western documentary crew (or bigfoot researchers) to go asking around for witnesses and stories in the wildest parts of those mountains.

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