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Washington - Puget Sound



Click the images below for a larger view. See the discussion forum thread about these tracks.

 


The image above should be refered to as "Puget-One" in the discussion forum.




The image above should be refered to as "Puget-Two" in the discussion forum.

These photos were obtained near Puget Sound not long after the major snow storm of Christmas 2008.

There have been several sightings in the Puget Sound region over the years, including some mentioned in John Green's "The Apes Among Us." Old reports and Indian legends from a specific part of the Sound, combined with some new local informants, led BFRO Investigator Derek Randles to look around there after the big Christmas snowstorm, on a hunch that snow tracks might be easier to spot. This was the storm that pinned down Seattle for a few days. Seattle and the Puget Sound rarely get as much snow as they did at the end of 2008.

Deer herds tend to move around after big snow storms, especially in areas that rarely receive snow. Derek had an hunch that snow tracks of resident sasquatches might be easier to spot as well. Apparently he was right.

There were at least 24 tracks counted crossing a meadow where snow had not yet melted. The tracks continued on into the woods beyond the point that he stopped counting them.

The tracks were roughly 16.5 inches long. The strides were roughly 4.5 ft long. The gloves shown in the photo are 10.5 inches long.

We know much more about this location now than we did when the photos were first obtained. Suffice it to say we are quite confident that these snow tracks are legitimate.

Notice the "high-wire" pattern of the tracks -- the linear pattern, as if the figure was walking along a tight rope. Human tracks normally make a zig-zap pattern when we walk or run, and our feet are pointed slightly outward. The longer strides of sasquatch tracks fall into a straighter line, with the feet pointed slightly inward, rather than outward, in many of the steps.



The image above should be refered to as "Puget-Three" in the discussion forum.

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When a sasquatch is moving slower (i.e. their tracks show a shorter stride) the pattern is more like the zig-zag pattern of a human walk. As the stride gets longer, however, the footprints are more or less directly in front of each other.

There will be many ideas and theories for why this would be. Anyone speculating on this should consider that sasquatches live in a different world than humans. They often walk and run along narrow deer trails -- trails that can be traveled at much higher speeds, with less snagging on the sides of those trails, if the feet are falling in front of each other rather than to the sides. As with most adaptations among animals, the environment and lifestyle of sasquatches will usually help explain their adaptations.

Click the images below for a larger view. See the discussion forum thread about these tracks.